Garden Centerpieces

Apr 13, 2016 | Projects/Crafts

I volunteered to provide the April centerpieces for a horticulture group I belong to, and I had a vision of honoring plants and their spring awakings. At this time of year it’s easy to rejoice in the showy daffodils and Forsythia, but most of the action in our landscapes is smaller and much more subtle. On the forest floors and fields, beyond our cleaned and mulched gardens, the magic is pushing through leaf litter and unfolding in quiet pockets. That’s what I wanted these centerpieces to celebrate.

My vision was that they should be planted in hollowed logs or curves of bark, since such downed and rotting trees is what feeds these plants in future years. Fortunately, my husband understood this and helped me find a downed cherry and oak tree that were perfect for my purposes. He also assisted in hollowing out the oaks, since they, unlike the cherry trunk, didn’t already come with a central cavity.

Once the containers were ready I needed small plants that were just breaking dormancy. So I called a fellow plant geek, Barry Glick, at Sunshine Farm and Gardens. I knew Barry would have some small pots of native woodland plants, and sure enough, he immediately suggested three that were perfect for my purposes. When I said “I’m thinking a fern that is just starting to unfurl…” Barry replied, “I’ve got some Polystichum acrostichoides in two inch pots.”

Next, Barry suggested Trillium cuneatum and Hepatica acutiloba, and trusting his judgement (and knowledge of his stock of woodland native plants) I said “Perfect!” When his plants arrived I unpacked them, potted up the bare-root Hepatica, and went into my backyard to collect the rest of the materials.

My yard is filled with several species of mosses, which I love, and I took a bit here and pinch there, never removing much from any one location. In the shady part of the field near the lake there are large areas of spotted wintergreen (Chimaphila maculata) and I dug a few of these. I know that this plant might end up being a “cut flower” in my arrangements since they don’t tend to transplant well.

Finally, all the ingredients were planted into the logs and I was thrilled with the results. I think that they capture the feeling of the awaking landscape and honor the magic that is happening as spring unfolds.

On the table.

On the table.

I potted up the logs in the garage, and then loaded them into my garden cart to take them to my seed-starting shed. My friend Karen said that they looked like sushi rolls...

I potted up the logs in the garage, and then loaded them into my garden cart to take them to my seed-starting shed. My friend Karen said that they looked like sushi rolls…

 

My favorite containers were the cherry logs that had holes and cavities in them. I placed all of them in the solar heated shed to grow on for a day or two before the event.

My favorite containers were the cherry logs that had holes and cavities in them. I placed all of them in the solar heated shed to grow on for a day or two before the event.

Note: It was especially gratifying that the wait staff at the Holiday Inn where the event was held immediately commented on these. “Oh! I love the centerpieces!” the bartender said. Even non-plant geeks responded with joy to this celebration of the woodland garden.

14 Comments

  1. Thomas Christopher

    Beautiful and very imaginative. You have really captured spring.

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Thanks, Thomas – your comment is so appreciated.

      Reply
  2. Mary Kay Condon

    Wonderful!

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Thanks, Mary Kay – looking forward to having you back on Cape!

      Reply
  3. Susan Rushton

    Absolutely gorgeous! Barry steered you towards some woodland jewels and you’ve combined them beautifully with the moss and the logs.

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Much appreciated, Susan. Kudos go to my husband, Dan, who helped create the log containers, and Barry at Sunshine Farm and Gardens who contributed his lovely native plants.

      Reply
  4. Neal Klabunde

    Great idea and execution.

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Thanks so much, Neal. As a fellow dirty-fingernails gardener, your praise means a lot.

      Reply
  5. Ruth Rogers Clausen

    What a brilliant idea. How long will they last do you think? Would they survive in shade through the summer or just outgrow?

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Although they will live in these logs for a month or two, if you want these plants to ultimately spread and thrive, they should be planted in the woodland, part-shade environment that they prefer.

      Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Thanks, Barry – but my vision would have been nothing had it not been for your great plants.

      Reply
  6. Marcia

    Rather fabulous! Well done

    Reply
    • CL Fornari

      Thanks, Marcia!

      Reply

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